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A no-kill sanctuary for cats

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT FERAL CATS

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Female, feral cat at a feeding station.

Image source: Wikimedia Commons

What is a feral cat?

A feral cat is an unowned, free-roaming, outdoor cat who has had little or no contact with people during its life. These cats often live with other ferals in groups called colonies.

Can I adopt a feral cat?

Typically fearful of people and accustomed to life outdoors, ferals are unlikely to become anyone’s pets. Kittens born to feral mothers may be socialized by humans, however, provided the process begins when they are young. Pet Pride has successfully rescued, socialized, and homed once-feral kittens.

How is a feral cat different from a stray?

A stray cat is used to human contact and proximity and may have been someone’s pet at one time. Lost or abandoned, stray cats are homeless. While some may need an adjustment period, many strays can become pets once again. Some of Pet Pride’s cats are rescued strays just waiting for their forever homes.

What is the best way to help feral cats?

Trap-neuter-return, or TNR, is endorsed by The Humane Society of the United States, the ASPCA, and many other animal welfare organizations as an effective and humane way of engaging with feral cats. The cats are trapped, spayed or neutered and vaccinated, and returned to their outdoor homes. This helps control the feral cat population over time, contributes to a healthier life for the cats, and makes them better neighbors by decreasing behaviors such as yowling, spraying, and fighting that are typical of unaltered mating cats.

That sounds complicated.

Pet Pride can direct you to TNR resources and assistance.

What else can I do to help feral cats?

Consider becoming a colony caretaker. These dedicated individuals feed the feral cats in a colony on a regular schedule, transport them to a veterinarian for spay/neuter surgery and emergency care, and provide outdoor shelter.

How can Pet Pride help me to help them?

We have an experienced colony caretaker on our Board of Directors who would be happy to speak with you and provide direction on these important aspects of caring for a feral cat colony:
• how to set up feeding stations for the cats
• where to purchase an insulated outdoor shelter or how to construct one
• where to obtain additional TNR resources and assistance


For more information on becoming a colony caretaker, please email Marlies or call 585.402.9878.

Sources:

“Outdoor Cats FAQ”. Humane Society of the United States.
Retrieved 19 May 2019.

“Why Trap-Neuter-Return Feral Cats? The Case for TNR”. Alley Cat Allies.
Retrieved 14 May 2019.

“A Closer Look at Community Cats.” ASPCA.
Retrieved 17 May 2019.

“Community Cat Programs Handbook: Strays and Ferals”. Best Friends Animal Society.
Retrieved 14 May 2019.